Hotel de Belle Vue à Deutz vis-à-vis de Cologne tenu pour J.A. Kimmel. [

Cologne, c. 1850

Lithograph folded broadside (490 x 190 mm.), with a large engraved view of the hotel (mounted), a town map of Cologne and large panorama of the Rhine on the verso; the text is in French.

£250

Approximately:
US $319€274

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Hotel de Belle Vue à Deutz vis-à-vis de Cologne tenu pour J.A. Kimmel. [

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A ambitious lithograph advertisement for the Hotel de Belle Vue in Deutz, facing Cologne over the Rhine. The finely engraved view of the hotel shows it with its surrounding park lying on the Rhine which is bustling with barges, there is a bridge crossing the river full of promenading people. The litho map of Cologne indicates the places worth visiting in the city. The verso of the broadside is entirely taken up with a litho panorama of the Rhine from Cologne, over Dusseldorf to Mainz. On either side are litho maps for the railway journey from Cologne to Berlin and from Cologne to Paris, at the bottom there is a view of Cologne cathedral.

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