The Turf and the Racehorse, describing Trainers and Training, the Stud-Farm, the Sires and Brood-Mares of the Past and Present, and how to breed and rear the Racehorse.

London, Day & Son, 1865.

8vo, pp. vi, [1], [1 (blank)], 299, [11], 311-330, [2 (blank)]; title foxed, otherwise a very good copy; publisher’s green pictorial pebble-grained cloth blocked in blind and gilt, edges gilt; lightly rubbed at extremities, minor splits to hinges, front free endpaper removed; inscribed by R.D. Alexander, November 1868, subsequent gift inscription from the same to J.M. Ricketts, dated 1869.

£160

Approximately:
US $178€181

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The Turf and the Racehorse, describing Trainers and Training, the Stud-Farm, the Sires and Brood-Mares of the Past and Present, and how to breed and rear the Racehorse.

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First edition of a scarce account of mid-nineteenth-century race horses, including notes and anecdotes on breeding, buying, training, and racing, and with an extensive table of ‘the tried brood mares of the day’, showing their pedigrees and progeny.

Mellon 205.

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