Horses in Accident and Disease: Notes and Sketches.

Edinburgh, George Waterston & Sons for David Douglas, 1892.

8vo, pp. [8], [112], [22 (publisher’s advertisements)]; 28 woodcut illustrations; a very good copy in publisher’s red cloth-backed boards with orange cloth sides, upper board blocked in black and spine lettered directly in gilt, top-edge gilt; lightly rubbed and bumped at extremities; armorial bookplate of J.W. Macfie to upper pastedown.

£70

Approximately:
US $87€82

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Horses in Accident and Disease: Notes and Sketches.

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First edition of an elegantly illustrated veterinary work. An early advocate of the use of chloroform anaesthetic when operating on horses, J. Roalfe Cox here offers tender line drawings and brief descriptions of twenty-eight equine ailments.

Not in Mellon; not in Dingley.

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