HOW MUCH MORE THE SKILLED WORKER SHOULD BE PAID THAN HIS UNSKILLED COUNTERPART

Examen de quelques questions d’économie politique, et notamment de l’ouvrage de M. Ferrier intitulé Du Gouvernement considéré dans ses rapports avec le commerce.

Paris, Pelicier, 1823.

8vo, pp. [iv], 248; a few small spots throughout, but a very good, crisp copy, uncut in the original pink paper wrappers, printed paper label to spine, a couple of short splits to the spine, some chips to extremities; unsigned contemporary presentation ink inscription to the front pastedown.

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Examen de quelques questions d’économie politique, et notamment de l’ouvrage de M. Ferrier intitulé Du Gouvernement considéré dans ses rapports avec le commerce.

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First edition. Dubois-Aymé uses mathematical methodology to examine two of the cases he considers. In the first instance he ‘compares the power due to the riches of two countries. This power he maintains is in proportion to the goods available to each country over and above its indispensable requirements for consumption and reproduction’ (Theocharis, p. 80). Later he discusses ‘the relation between the salary of the unskilled worker and that of the skilled worker, who needs to undergo a period of apprenticeship at a certain expense. The condition is that the salary of the skilled worker should be such as to give him over his shorter working life total earnings equal to his earnings as a general labourer plus his costs of apprenticeship’ (Theocharis, p. 80).

Einaudi 1625; Goldsmiths’ 23733; Kress C.1052; Theocharis, see pp. 80-81.

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