L’industrie et la morale considérées dans leurs rapports avec la liberté.

Paris, A. Sautelet, 1825.

8vo, pp. [vi], viii, 450; a very good, clean copy in contemporary calf-backed boards, spine gilt in compartments, gilt morocco lettering-piece; upper joint cracked but firm, small chips at head and tail of spine; small ownership inscription on title-page.

£350

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L’industrie et la morale considérées dans leurs rapports avec la liberté.

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First edition of this defence of the old economic liberalism against the new democracy by the French economist and politician Dunoyer (1786-1863). ‘In anticipation of Spencer, Dunoyer here developed the idea that society was an organism, in which it fell to the lot of a congeries of institutions and individuals to perform specific functions. The function of government was the preservation of order, and to this role ... he ... assigned vital importance. To justify the work of government officials as well of those supporters of the bourgeois monarchy who were drawn from the professional classes, Dunoyer extended the classical concept of product to include the ‘immaterial’ product or service; in this he followed J. B. Say, Germain Garnier and Destutt de Tracy’ (Encyclopaedia of the Social Sciences). Dunoyer defined liberty as the power to make free and intelligent use of faculties. This work was later revised and enlarged under a new title, De la liberté du travail (Paris, 1845).

Einaudi 1652; Goldsmiths’ 24398; Kress C.1413.

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