Opyt estestvennoi istorii vsekh zhivotnykh Rossiiskoi Imperii … S izobrazheniiami zhivotnykh. [Fly-title:] Zhivotnyia miagkiia i rakovinnyia [- An Attempt at the natural history of all the animals of the Russian Empire … with illustrations of the animals. [Fly-title:] Soft and shelled animals].

Moscow, University Press, 1831

8vo, pp. 72, [10], with a terminal errata leaf and twelve leaves of engraved illustrations (an octopus, slugs, snails and shellfish); the two index leaves, giving Russian and Latin names, are bound in error before the final text leaf; title and following leaf repaired at inner margin, old repair to tear to foot of Б8, without loss, some minor spotting to text, outer edge of one or two plates shaved just touching captions; a good copy, lacking endleaves, in early quarter cloth and marbled boards, rebacked; old shelf mark to title, stamped monogram to verso of title.

£2000

Approximately:
US $2495€2364

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Opyt estestvennoi istorii vsekh zhivotnykh Rossiiskoi Imperii … S izobrazheniiami zhivotnykh. [Fly-title:] Zhivotnyia miagkiia i rakovinnyia [- An Attempt at the natural history of all the animals of the Russian Empire … with illustrations of the animals. [Fly-title:] Soft and shelled animals].

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First edition, rare, one of a series of six works on the flora and fauna of the Russian Empire, published 1829-1833 under the same general title. The present volume covers molluscs, including cephalopods and gastropods.

Dvigubsky (1771-1839) was Professor of Physics at the Imperial Moscow University, but his scientific interests ranged through biology, chemistry and medicine. He was also the University rector for 7 years. His surveys of Russia’s flora and fauna were among the first attempts at a coordinated catalogue of the country’s wildlife.

OCLC shows copies at Minneapolis Public Library and Illinois; not in COPAC or KVK. There is also a set of the complete series at the National Library of Russia.

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