Discours sur les principes de l’education lycéenne, prononcé a l’inauguration du Lycée d’Angers par J.L. Ferri de St. Constant, proviseur; et imprimé d’après le vœu du bureau d’administration du lycée.

Angers, Frères Mame, 1806.

8vo, pp. 48; clean and crisp throughout, in the original printed wrappers; slight chip at head of spine, and upper cover with some light dustmarking, but still a very good copy.

£225

Approximately:
US $312€258

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Discours sur les principes de l’education lycéenne, prononcé a l’inauguration du Lycée d’Angers par J.L. Ferri de St. Constant, proviseur; et imprimé d’après le vœu du bureau d’administration du lycée.

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Only edition, rare, of this speech by the Italian writer and educationalist Giovanni Ferri de St. Constant (1755-1830), on the inauguration of the Lycée at Angers. Ferri, who had worked in France before the radicalisation of the revolution had led to his exile in England, had returned to France with the arrival in power of Napoleon, and became rector of the University of Angers in 1811; his success in this role led to his being appointed to a similar position at the Sapienza in Rome, where he was tasked with reforming the university’s courses of study along the lines of the French system.

In the present discourse, dedicated to Hugues Maret, Ferri discusses the benefits of the lycée system established under Napoleon in 1801, explaining the evolution of French education and the founding principles of the lycée, and reflecting on the purpose of education in the modern age, the necessity of banning ‘l’injustice et la dureté des maitres, [and] la tristesse et l’oppression des enfans’; children should learn by simple methods and by example.

OCLC records only the BnF.

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