Catullus Carmen 17.6 and Other Mysteries. A Study in Editorial Conflict, Eccentricity, Forgery, and Restitution. With a checklist of significant printed editions of Catullus in Latin, 1472-2005.

London, The Author, 2020.

8vo (230 x 155 mm), pp. 86; three illustrations; in paper wrappers.

£15

Approximately:
US $18€17

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This partly historical, partly philological essay offers a general account of the early preservation, post-medieval recovery, and Renaissance evolution of the text of Catullus, with specific reference to one speculative reading in Carmen 17 (‘De Colonia’), and certain humanist twists and forgeries that accompanied its long editorial history.

Accompanying the narrative is a substantial bibliographical appendix that provides a checklist of significant editions of Catullus in Latin from 1475 to the present day, with brief notes of relevance and location.

Arthur Freeman is a rare book dealer and writer living in London. In 2014 Quaritch published his Bibliotheca Fictiva: a Collection of Books and Manuscripts Relating to Literary Forgery 400 BC – AD 2000. Catullus Carmen 17.6 is the second footnote to that book, following Julia Alpinula (2015).

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