Malay seals from the Islamic world of Southeast Asia.

Singapore, NUS Press in association with the British Library, 2019.

Folio (31 x 23 cm), pp. xxii, 785, [1 blank]; coloured maps and reproductions; green cloth, pictorial dust-jacket.

£85

Approximately:
US $105€94

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Malay seals from the Islamic world of Southeast Asia.

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A new publication by Annabel Teh Gallop, Lead Curator in Southeast Asia Collections at the British Library, published by NUS Press in Singapore. The British Library website describes Malay seals as ‘a catalogue of 2,168 seals sourced from more than 70 public institutions and 60 private collections worldwide. The seals are primarily recorded from impressions stamped in lampblack, ink or wax on manuscript letters, treaties and other documents, but around 300 seal matrices made of silver, brass or stone are also documented. These Malay seals originate from the present-day territories of Malaysia, Brunei, Singapore, Indonesia and the southern parts of Thailand, Cambodia and the Philippines, and date from the second half of the 16th century to the early twentieth century.’

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