Essays … Collecta revirescunt.

London: Printed for W. Griffin … 1765.

12mo., pp. [2], vii, [1], 236, [2], with an engraved title-page by Isaac Taylor, and a terminal advertisement leaf; wormtrack to upper outer corner, touching the pagination in a couple of instances, but a very good copy in attractive contemporary speckled calf, spine gilt, a little restoration to front joint; contemporary letterpress booklabel of Thomas Mann, nineteenth century gift inscriptions.

£500

Approximately:
US $699€567

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First edition, a collection of twenty-seven essays. The other edition of 1765, more cheaply printed and with a letterpress title-page, is given priority by Temple Scott, but Rothschild suggests it is a piracy or a cheap edition printed to meet extra demand – it is certainly less generously imposed, and does not include advertisments for Griffin. Although he is not named in the imprint John Newbery, who had just published Goldsmith’s Traveller, was involved in the publication.

Rothschild 1027; Temple Scott p. 156; Williams p. 136.

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