CENSORED

Decretales Gregorii Noni pontificis cum epitomis, divisionibus, et glossis ordinariis, una cum additionibus novissime recognitae … studio et industria clarissimi iureconsulti VV. doct. celeberrimi …

Lyons, Pierre Fradin for Hugues de la Porte and Antoine Vincent, 1559.

4to, pp. [68], 1151, [1 (blank)]; 2 leaves with letterpress and woodcut ‘Arbor affinitatis’ and ‘Arbor consanguinitatis’ bound in after p. 892; printed in red and black throughout, woodcut Vincent device to title, woodcut initials, text in two columns surrounded by gloss and marginal notes; intermittent dampstaining and browning (mostly marginal), a few small marginal holes from ink corrosion; overall a good copy in contemporary Italian vellum over boards, vestigial ties to fore-edge, ‘Decretales’ lettered in ink at head of spine and to tail-edge of text block, spine slotted, sewn on 3 tanned thongs laced in; some wear to spine and corners, some staining to covers; sixteenth-century ink inscription at foot of title ‘hic liber fuit reuisus et correptus ex co[m]missione d. inquisitoris genuae frater stephanus de fin[ari]o or[din]is prae[dicatorum] inquisitor gen[era]lis genuae manu propria’ (see below); censorship (i.e. text crossed through in ink) to marginal notes and commentary on c. 325 pp., the initials ‘C.M.’ to side notes consistently obscured.

£3500

Approximately:
US $4449€4097

Add to basket Make an enquiry

Added to your basket:
Decretales Gregorii Noni pontificis cum epitomis, divisionibus, et glossis ordinariis, una cum additionibus novissime recognitae … studio et industria clarissimi iureconsulti VV. doct. celeberrimi …

Checkout now

Lyons edition of the Decretals of Gregory IX with the controversial commentary of the French jurist Charles Dumoulin (1500–1566), thoroughly censored in manuscript by the inquisitor general of Genoa.

Completed in 1234 under the editorship of the Dominican Raymond of Penafort, the collection of canon law known as the Decretals or Liber extra was one of the greatest achievements of the papacy of Gregory IX. It soon attracted numerous glossators, including the renowned canonist Giovanni d’Andrea.

Related by descent to Anne Boleyn, Charles Dumoulin (or Molinaeus) was one of the greatest French jurists of the sixteenth century. In 1542 he embraced Calvinism and then Lutheranism, his subsequent attacks on the papacy compelling him to seek refuge in Germany. In 1553-4 his monumental five-volume Corpus juris canonici appeared at Lyons, the first volume being dedicated to Gregory’s Decretals and presenting the text and glosses alongside Dumoulin’s own marginal commentary. It was this commentary, not infrequently hostile to the pope, which prompted the inclusion of Dumoulin’s work on the Index librorum prohibitorum of 1559, the same year in which this edition was published.

The inclusion of the work on the Index prompted the Inquisition to issue instructions for the censorship of Dumoulin’s notes. In our copy this has been dutifully and painstakingly carried out by the Dominican Stefano Calvisio da Finale, whose manuscript note to the title describes himself as ‘inquisitor general of Genoa’, and who in fact served as inquisitor to the whole region of Liguria from 1568 to 1571. On over three hundred pages of text, Calvisio has obliterated chunks of Dumoulin’s notes with brown ink, in addition to systematically obscuring the initials ‘C.M.’ in hundreds of instances.

USTC 152654; Gültlingen, Bibliographie des livres imprimés à Lyon au seizième siècle XI, p. 88: 82.

You may also be interested in...