‘ONE OF THE MOST INVENTIVE PRE-20TH CENTURY AMERICAN ECONOMISTS’

Economics. An account of the relations between private property and public welfare.

New York and London, G. P. Putnam’s Sons, 1896.

8vo, pp. [2], xi, [1 blank], 496, [2 advertisements]; short tear to blank margin of a few leaves; a nice, clean copy in the original publisher’s cloth, rebacked, gilt-lettered spine, top edge gilt.

£175

Approximately:
US $214€203

Make an enquiry

Added to your basket:
Economics. An account of the relations between private property and public welfare.

Checkout now

First edition. ‘In Economics Hadley went further than Marshall by explicitly developing the interrelations between property rights, economic evolution and economic efficiency. Hadley utilized the real world examples of the fisheries and mining to demonstrate the impact of ill-defined property rights on depletable resources, emphasizing the necessity of altered systems to obtain optimal resource use and allocation. This contribution, along with his prophetic analyses of transport market structure, establishes Hadley as one of the most inventive pre-20th century American economists’ (The New Palgrave).

Batson, p. 26f; Fundaburk 7977.

You may also be interested in...

THE ABOLITION OF POVERTY [PASCOLI, Livio.] ‘Vilio LOCASPI’.

Del modo di mantenere abolita la mendicità, discorso familiare.

Only edition, very rare, of this proposal for the abolition of begging, and of poverty more broadly, by the poet and essayist Livio Pascoli.

Read more

HARTLEY David.

The state of the nation with a preliminary defence of the budget.

First edition. David Hartley (1731-1813) was a politician and supporter of the rebel Americans, and a particularly close friend of Benjamin Franklin. In parliament he was a consistent supporter of the Rockingham (later Fox) faction, the self-styled whig party. He wrote and orated a great deal on America and supported his fellow MP for Hull, William Wilberforce, in introducing proposals that he hoped would lead to the ending of slavery. ‘The State of the Nation’ was a reply to Thomas Whately’s ‘Remarks on the budget’, and comprises Hartley’s account of the finances of 1765, discussing in particular Grenville’s budget taxing articles of American commerce.

Read more