PERSIAN REVOLUTIONARIES: A DISPLAY OF FORCE

'Baktiaris Persans'.

[Iran, c. 1905-1911].

Gelatin silver (copy) print, 13 x 18 cm, photographer’s ink stamp ‘Maison Vve. L. Harlingue, reportage photographique, 5, Rue Seveste, 5, Téléphone 445 43’ and title in pencil on verso; in very good condition.

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An impressive press image of the Bakhtiari tribe – revolutionaries in the Persian Constitutional Revolution of 1905-1911 – here posing in strength with their weapons. Their leader, Sardar As’ad Bakhtiari (1856-1917), was a key figure in the Iranian revolution; under his command (and with German Empire weapons) these forces captured Tehran in 1909 to reinstate the constitution, heralding the modern era.

The Harlingue agency was established at the Parisian address on the verso of this print in 1905.

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