The Oeconomy of Human Life. Part the Second. Translated from an Indian Manuscript, found soon after that which contain’d the Original of the first Part; and written by the same Hand. In a second letter from an English Gentleman residing at China, to the Earl of * * *

London: Printed for M. Cooper ... 1751.

8vo., pp. viii, 136; a fine copy in contemporary tree calf, spine gilt, with the bookplate of John Pollexfen Bastard.

£350

Approximately:
US $390€398

Make an enquiry

Added to your basket:
The Oeconomy of Human Life. Part the Second. Translated from an Indian Manuscript, found soon after that which contain’d the Original of the first Part; and written by the same Hand. In a second letter from an English Gentleman residing at China, to the Earl of * * *

Checkout now

First edition of this opportunistic work by the self-styled ‘Sir’ John Hill (so attributed in ESTC). It purports to be the sequel to Robert Dodsley’s highly successful The Oeconomy of Life (1750; sometimes attributed to P. D. Stanhope, Earl of Chesterfield), and is written in the same poetic prose mode of simple wisdom concretely imagined, a mode that clearly owes far more to the authorised translations of Old Testament poetry than to any oriental antecedent.

You may also be interested in...

LEWIS, Wyndham.

Paleface, the Philosophy of the melting Pot.

First edition, a considerably expanded version of an essay which first appeared in The Enemy no. 2, examining ‘race-consciousness’ in contemporary literature and the ‘melting pot’ philosophy of America. ‘I am heart and soul upon the side of the Melting Pot, not upon that of the Barbed Wire’ he maintains, but there are chilling arguments against miscegenation and decrying ‘white guilt’. Particular targets of Lewis’s satire were Sherwood Anderson’s Dark Laughter and D. H. Lawrence’s Mornings in Mexico.

Read more

CORRECTED BROADCAST SCRIPT LEWIS, Wyndham, and D. G. BRIDSON.

Typescript for broadcast: ‘Satiric Verse … The text of a lecture delivered at Harvard University in January, 1940’.

Although a recording of Lewis reading from ‘One Way Song’ was made at Harvard in 1940, the lecture that accompanied it, ‘Satiric Verse’, was not then recorded. For the 1957 broadcast it was read by Walter Allen ‘from Lewis’s own manuscript notes’. Several other sections were read by Stephen Murray. Bridson produced, and provided an introduction and some linking remarks between sections.

Read more