Tables of interest, from one pound to five hundred millions, for one day; by which the interest for any sum of money within those limits may be found with more expedition than by any tables hitherto published. To the above are added, tables which have been formed with a view to expedite the business of those who deal in goods that are sold by the hundred weight.

12mo in sixes, pp. viii, 120; short tear to the fore-edge of pp. 41-42 just touching a few characters, a very good copy bound in contemporary speckled sheep; joints cracked and eroded, but cords sound, extremities worn; contemporary ownership inscription to the title and rear flyleaf, the verso of the title signed by the author, bookplate of The Royal Institution of Chartered Surveyors Reference Library to the front pastedown.

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Tables of interest, from one pound to five hundred millions, for one day; by which the interest for any sum of money within those limits may be found with more expedition than by any tables hitherto published. To the above are added, tables which have been formed with a view to expedite the business of those who deal in goods that are sold by the hundred weight.

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One of two editions published in 1786, the other one undated, ESTC does not give any precedence. Tables for calculating interest at a quarter, half, three-quarters, three, four, and five percent; intended as a quick reference for bankers and merchants. Hurry precedes his tables with four pages of example banker’s accounts, demonstrating how his tables can be used.

This edition not in Goldsmiths’ or Kress, but see Kress B.1082 for the other imprint. Rare, COPAC, ESTC, and OCLC locate 6 British institutional copies; at the BL, Glasgow, Norwich, Royal College of Surgeons, Cambridge, and the NLS; and only 1 U.S. institutional copy; at Michigan.

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