Report on the Trade in Foreign Corn, and on the Agriculture of the north of Europe … To which is added, an Appendix of official documents, averages of prices, shipments, stocks on hand in the various exporting countries, &c. &c. &c.

London, James Ridgway, 1826.

8vo, pp. 249 (including 2 folding tables), [5] advertisements; occasional very light offsetting; a very good copy in recent wrappers.


US $307€250

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First edition; two further editions were published the same year. William Jacob (1762?–1851) was appointed to the comptrollership of corn returns in 1822. ‘He was commissioned by the Government in 1825 and 1827 to report on the condition of agriculture in some of the states of northern Europe; the results of his observations are contained in two Reports which contain valuable information and very full statistics of the state of land and the agricultural produce of those countries at that period’ (Palgrave II, 471).

Goldsmiths’ 24924; not in Einaudi, Kress, or Rothamsted.

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