Lavacrum conscientie [omnium sacerdotum].

[Colophon:] Cologne, Heinrich Quentell, 1504.

4to, ff. [i], 57, [1], gothic letter in two columns, with a woodcut initial at beginning of text; occasional minor marginal dampstaining, wormhole in text sometimes resulting in loss of a letter (sense recoverable), but a very good copy in early nineteenth-century boards, red morocco lettering-piece on spine; slightly rubbed, upper joint cracked but firm; from the library of Robert Crewe-Milnes, 1st Marquess of Crewe (1858–1945), with bookplate.

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Rare edition of this popular late medieval treatise widely ascribed to the Carthusian monk Jacobus de Gruytrode (c. 1400–1475). Essentially a handbook for priests, with a significant devotional element, it was first published between 1487 and 1489. According to Theodor Petreius, Bibliotheca Cartusiana (Cologne, 1609), the actual author is Johannes Meskirchius (Messkirch, d. 1511), a monk at the charterhouse of Güterstein near Stuttgart (for Messkirch see R. Deigendesch, ‘Bücher und ihre Schenker – Die Bücherlisten der Kartause Güterstein in Württemberg’, in S. Lorenz, ed., Bücher, Bibliotheken und Schriftkultur der Kartäuser. Festgabe zum 65. Geburtstag von Edward Potkowski, Stuttgart 2002, pp. 93–115).

VD16 J 105. OCLC records only two copies outside Germany (National Library of Sweden and St. Bonaventure University). Not found in COPAC.

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