Studies in Deductive Logic. A Manual for Students.

London, Macmillan and Co., 1880.

8vo, pp. xxviii, 304, [4] advertisements + 34-page publisher’s catalogue and another advertisement leaf; leaf edges slightly tanned, extensive marginal annotations and underlining, mostly in pencil, a good copy in the original publisher’s pebbled cloth, spine direct-lettered gilt; somewhat shaken, extremities rubbed, slightly soiled; from the library of Edward Adolf Sonnenschein, with his signature to the half-title and his bookplate to the rear pastedown, later donated by his wife to the Bath Public Library, with their bookplate to the front pastedown and their embossed stamp to a number of leaves.

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First edition. Jevons had been preoccupied with speculations into the science of logic from the early 1860s. In his work Elementary Lessons in Logic (1870), he had sought to give a clear notion of the results to which the discoveries of Boole and his predecesssors necessarily led. The present work consists of a series of logical problems intended to continue and consolidate these ideas.

From the library of the classical scholar Edward Adolf Sonnenschein (1851-1929), older brother of the publisher William Swan Sonnenschein. Based on his signature to the half-title, the copious marginal notes appear to be in his hand.

Risse II, 104. Not in Einaudi or Mattioli.

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