The History of a tame Robin. Supposed to be written by Himself.

London: Printed for Darton, Harvey, and Darton … 1817.

12mo., pp. [2], 153, [1], with an engraved frontispiece, neatly coloured by a contemporary hand; slightly dusty, some light foxing, but a good copy in the publisher’s original quarter red roan and marbled boards; boards and spine somewhat rubbed.

£325

Approximately:
US $427€376

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First and only edition. The tame Robin recalls a life of adventure enriched by human and avian friendships. A childhood spent in a school-room helped him attain ‘a sufficient knowledge of literature to relate my adventures’. His life, though happy, is not without its vicissitudes: he loses a close friend, Goldey the goldfinch, to a bird of prey and spends a disconcerting time in the ownership of a spoilt child who starves sparrows to death.

This is the only known work by Marian Keene.

Darton G533.

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