Philosophia rationalis sive logica, centum assertiones comprehensa et publica disputationi in celeberrimo & antiquissimo Collegio Can. Reg. S. August. Congregat. Lateranensis ad Beatiss. Virg. Mariam in Rottenbuech. ...

Augsburg, Sturmin, 1695.

8vo, pp. [viii], 96, with engraved frontispiece portraying SS. Primus and Felicianus, by; woodcut head- and tailpieces and initials; small paper flaw to last leaf of prelims not affecting text, occasional marginal staining, but otherwise clean and crisp throughout; in contemporary coloured pastepaper wrappers; some loss to spine, but still an attractive copy.

£285

Approximately:
US $353€317

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Philosophia rationalis sive logica, centum assertiones comprehensa et publica disputationi in celeberrimo & antiquissimo Collegio Can. Reg. S. August. Congregat. Lateranensis ad Beatiss. Virg. Mariam in Rottenbuech. ...

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A good copy of this rare dissertation from the Augustinian college at Rottenbuch in Bavaria, attempting to reduce logic (the science of reasoning) to one hundred numbered paragraphs. Describing the function and limits of logic, the authors, both Austin canons at Rottenbuch, explain the use of syllogisms, the relationship of logic to epistemology, the theory of universals, necessity and contingency, and more.

Outside Germany, OCLC records just one copy, at Cambridge.

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