Heraldo Memoriale, or Memoirs of the College of Arms from 1727 to 1744. Edited by Anthony Richard Wagner.

The Roxburghe Club, 1981.

£100

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Heraldo Memoriale, or Memoirs of the College of Arms from 1727 to 1744. Edited by Anthony Richard Wagner.

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Stephen Martin Leake was Garter principal king of arms from 1754 to 1773. The three volumes of his extensive manuscript journal, Heraldo-Memoriale, are preserved in the College of Arms.

Anthony Wagner here presents selections from the second of the three volumes, ending with the death of the elder John Anstis, Garter, on 4 March 1744, and provides an introduction and notes.

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