ANNE & CHARLES LINDBERGH’S FLIGHT ACROSS THE SOUTHERN ATLANTIC

Listen! The Wind ... With Foreword and Map Drawings by Charles A. Lindbergh.

New York: Harcourt, Brace & Co., 1938.

8vo (203 x 136mm), pp. xii, 275, [1 (blank)]; 3 full-page maps and one illustration after Charles Lindbergh; one half-tone plate; original red cloth blocked in gilt with airplane design on upper board and lettered in gilt on the spine, map endpapers after Charles Lindbergh, top edges blue, pictorial dustwrapper, with design after Charles Lindbergh, retaining price, glassine dustwrapper, morocco backed slipcase, spine lettered and decorated in gilt; lettering on spine slightly dulled, dustwrapper slightly rubbed and chipped at edges, glassine dustwrapper browned and chipped at edges, nonetheless a very good, bright copy, retaining the pictorial and glassine dustwrappers.

£400

Approximately:
US $558€469

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First edition of an award-winning book. Anne Morrow Lindbergh (1906-2001) met the celebrated American aviator Charles Lindbergh in 1927, when her father Dwight Morrow, the American ambassador to Mexico, invited Lindbergh to visit the country. They married in 1929, she soon learnt to fly under his tutelage, and then became her husband’s trusted co-pilot; indeed, in 1930, she became the first woman to receive a United States Glider Pilot Licence – one of numerous ‘firsts’ as a female pilot. In 1931 the Lindberghs undertook a historic series of flights in their specially-adapted Lockheed Sirius, Tingmissartog, travelling across Alaska and Canada to Japan and China, in order to explore new routes for airmail. Anne Lindbergh recorded the experiences in her best-selling book North to the Orient (New York: 1935) – which won the inaugural National Book Award for Nonfiction – and in 1933 the Lindberghs made a survey flight around the North Atlantic Ocean: ‘[t]he purpose of the flight was to study the air-routes between America and Europe. At that time, the air-routes of the world were entering their final stages of development. The countries had already been crossed and the continents connected. It remained only for the oceans to be spanned. Their great overwater distances constituted the last major barrier to the commerce of the air’ (p. v).

After crossing the northern part of the Atlantic from New York to Copenhagen, the Lindberghs flew south to Africa and then crossed the southern part of the Atlantic, and Listen! The Wind describes the flight across the southern Atlantic. The book reflects the collaborative nature of the flight, and the body of the book is Anne Morrow Lindbergh’s work, complemented by Charles Lindbergh’s foreword, appendix, maps, and dustwrapper design. Anne Morrow Lindbergh’s exploits earned her the National Geographic Society’s Hubbard Gold Medal in 1934.

Bennett, A Practical Guide to American Book Collecting (1663-1940), p. 237.

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