The Best of Myles.

New York: Walker & Company, 1968.

8vo., pp. 400; yellow publisher’s cloth, stamped in black and red on spine, top edge stained yellow; some faint, scattered foxing to boards, otherwise a fine copy in an excellent, unclipped dust-jacket.

£150

Approximately:
US $167€170

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First US edition, preceded by the London, MacGibbon & Kee edition of the same year.

A selection from ‘Cruiskeen Lawn’, the daily column O’Brien wrote for The Irish Times under the pen name Myles na Gopaleen (Miles of the Little Horses), in which he produced some of his funniest and most wildly inventive work.

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