John Owen’s Epigrams for Prince Henry. The Text of the Presentation Manuscript in the Library of Trinity College Cambridge. With introduction and notes by Nicholas Poole-Wilson.

Douglas, Isle of Man, published by Bernard Quaritch Ltd., 2012.

297 x 210 mm, pp. [76], with 8 colour plates; pictorial card wrappers.

£20

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John Owen’s Epigrams for Prince Henry. The Text of the Presentation Manuscript in the Library of Trinity College Cambridge. With introduction and notes by Nicholas Poole-Wilson.

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Printed here for the first time is the text of an autograph manuscript of the epigrams which John Owen presented to Prince Henry, eldest son of James VI of Scotland (I of England), on the occasion of his becoming Prince of Wales in 1610. The small quarto, preserved at Trinity College, Cambridge, is the only surviving manuscript in Owen’s own hand. It contains 105 epigrams, of which 25 appear in print here for the first time; others present a text frequently at variance with the printed versions which Owen published in 1612, the year of Henry’s death.  The subjects are a characteristic cross-section of his bitter-sweet jests and jibes. 

The manuscript is edited with an introduction and notes by Nicholas Poole-Wilson, longtime student and collector of Owen’s printed editions.  It contains an illustration of the binding and 7 double-page plates reproducing pages from the text. 

ISBN 978-0-9563012-3-9

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