Votez toujours. Je ferai le reste [Always vote. I’ll do the rest].

Paris, Comite d'initiative pour un movement revolutionnaire, Imprimerie Robert et Cie, 1968.

75cm x 55cm, backed on linen, fine (A).

£550

Approximately:
US $721€615

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First edition. A striking image of General De Gaulle patting France on the head for obediently voting, a baton cunningly concealed behind him. 1968 was a year when passions were flying high in France. The communist and socialist parties had formed an alliance in February with a view to replacing the De Gaulle administration. The ensuing student occupation protests coupled with wildcat general strikes of over 20% of the French population seriously destablized De Gaulle’s government, and for some time it seemed likely that it would fall. Having fled briefly to Germany, however, De Gaulle called elections for June 1968, and emerged with an increased majority.

The present poster, the production of the allied anti-Gaullist faction, urges caution to the prospective voter, with the reminder that with De Gaulle things are not always as they appear.

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