The journal of a mission to the interior of Africa, in the year 1805 . . . Together with other documents, official and private, relating to the same mission. To which is prefixed an account of the life of Mr. Park. The second edition, revised and corrected, with additions.

London, John Murray, 1815.

4to; pp. [iii]–xvii, [iii], 373, with a folding map; without the half-title, map lightly offset onto facing text page, slight offsetting from turn-ins on title, but an excellent copy in contemporary tan calf; very skilfully rebacked preserving the original morocco lettering-piece; from the library of Sir John Hay, 5th Baronet (1755–1830), of Haystoun, with gilt arms in centre of covers.

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The journal of a mission to the interior of Africa, in the year 1805 . . . Together with other documents, official and private, relating to the same mission. To which is prefixed an account of the life of Mr. Park. The second edition, revised and corrected, with additions.

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Second edition, revised and expanded. Park perished in the course of this, his second expedition to Africa, but fortunately he had earlier sent back his journal, which is the basis of this volume. It was edited for publication by John Whishaw, who contributed a substantial biographical introduction. The second edition comprises new material, including Walter Scott’s recollections of Park, which had come to the editor’s knowledge only after the initial publication of the Journal earlier in 1815 (see Todd & Bowden, Sir Walter Scott, a bibliographical history p. 381). These additions were also printed separately so that owners of the first edition could update their copies.

Ibrahim-Hilmy II p. 93; see also PMM p. 153.

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