Which? Have you a reason or only an excuse for not enlisting Now!

London, The Abbey Press, 1915.

498 x 755mm, linen-backed, a little light restoration to previous folds, generally very good (A-).

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Which? Have you a reason or only an excuse for not enlisting Now!

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A forthright call to the men of London, encouraging them to enlist for military service during World War One.

The Parliamentary Recruiting Committee was set up on the outbreak of war. A cross-party organisation under the watchful eye of Asquith, it produced some 200 different recruiting designs before the advent of conscription in January 1916.

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