Centro dei Comunisti. Lotta di classe e potere politico in Portogallo (Quaderni Comunisti).

Rome, 26 September 1975.

Folio, pp. 78, [2]; illustrated with photographs, folded colour poster loosely inserted; a little light spotting; very good.

£100

Approximately:
US $136€116

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An historical overview of the Portuguese ‘Carnation Revolution’ of 25 April 1974 and its aftermath, including a reproduction of João Abel Manta’s famous poster showing Vasco Gonçalves, Portugal’s prime minister, with his arms around a member of the MFA (Movimento das Forças Armadas) and one of the people. Gonçalves had been dismissed from office the week before this publication appeared.

No copies outside Italy on OCLC.

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