Сѣверные цвѣты на 1825 годъ [Severnye tsvety na 1825 god, ‘Northern flowers for the year 1825’]. [Vol I (of 2)].

St Petersburg, Department of Public Education, 1825 [Moscow, Universitetskaia tip., 1881].

8vo, pp. [2], 359, [1 (blank)], [iii]-vi; faint spotting on title and in some margins, but a very good copy, in contemporary marbled boards, flat spine with gilt morocco lettering-piece; extremities and lettering-piece a little rubbed, one or two stains; occasional light pencil underlining, remains of a modern exlibris to the rear paste-down.

£1750

Approximately:
US $2185€2069

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Сѣверные цвѣты на 1825 годъ [Severnye tsvety na 1825 god, ‘Northern flowers for the year 1825’]. [Vol I (of 2)].

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Rare nineteenth-century Moscow reprint of the exceptionally rare first issue of Northern flowers, one of the most celebrated Russian literary anthologies, edited by Pushkin’s great friend Delvig. The 1825 issue included the first appearance of four passages from part ii of Eugene Onegin, and three of Pushkin’s poems: ‘Pesn o veshchem Olege’, ‘Demon’, and ‘Proserpina’. The excerpts from Onegin were meant to prepare the public and create a large market for Pushkin’s masterpiece, which was published between 1825 and 1832. The 1825 issue also contained several fables by Krylov, and contributions by V.A. Zhukovsky, E.A. Baratynsky.

Smirnov-Sokol’skii, Russ. lit. al’manakhi i sborniki XVIII-XIX, 1118. OCLC cites two copies only: Harvard and Yale.

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