CHESTERTON’S TRANSLATOR

Corrected carbon typescript, signed, of an essay entitled ‘Chesterton y los titeres’ (Chesterton and the puppets).

[1950s.]

4 leaves, 285 x 216 mm, carbon typescript with autograph corrections, signed by the author; lightly browned, previously stapled at top left-hand corner.

£1000

Approximately:
US $1399€1134

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An essay entitled ‘Chesterton y los titeres’, concerning Chesterton’s play The surprise, a religious allegory written in 1932 but first published posthumously in 1952. Reyes discusses the theological dimensions of Chesterton’s play, the use of puppets, Chesterton’s philosophy of the miracle, the enigma of the universe, and the significance of the ‘surprise’. Reyes has briefly inscribed the essay for the literary review to which he submitted it: ‘A Buenos Aires Literaria, Salud! A.R.’, and he has signed it in ink at the end. The text is corrected in type in a number of locations and in the author’s hand in five.
Like his friend Borges, Reyes finds much to admire in Chesterton’s work. Borges was among many admirers of Reyes’s translations of Chesterton into Spanish, many of which are still in print today. Reyes’s published translations of Chesterton include Orthodoxy (1917), The man who was Thursday (1919), A short history of England (1920), and The Innocence of Father Brown (1921).

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