Dissertazione sul costume di suonar le campane in occasione di temporali.

Faenza, Lodovico Genestri, 1787.

4to, pp. 31, [1] blank; with woodcut vignette on title, and woodcut head-piece and initial; with single engraved illustration on page 12; some spotting and foxing in places, but still crisp; in contemporary calf, covers with gilt borders, spine gilt; some light wear, but still an attractive copy, with the book-label of Giannalisa Feltrinelli on front paste-down.

£485

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An attractive copy of this rare dissertation in which the author, a Minorite friar, attempts to demonstrate scientifically that the popular practice of ringing church bells during storms in the attempt to dissipate storm clouds and minimise the danger from lightning in fact had no effect. Ricci explains the nature of lightning, the thinking behind the practice, and, citing examples from both France and Italy, shows how church belltowers have fallen victim to lightning despite the best efforts of their bellringers. Citing the likes of Volta and Landriani, Ricci argues against moral and physical objections that the practice is more dangerous than useful; the only thing bells are good for, in the case of a storm, is to warn the people of the impending danger.

OCLC records copies at Illinois and Gobi Library Services only.

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