The School for Scandal. A Comedy. As it is acted at the Theatre, Smoke-Alley, Dublin. [Dublin], Printed for the Booksellers. 1793.

[Dublin], Printed for the Booksellers. 1793

8vo. in fours, pp. 123, [5, blanks and epilogue], with two plates, both here bound before the title-page but often at pp. 73 and 93 where they refer to the text; a fine copy in modern boards.

£750

Approximately:
US $982€854

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First separate illustrated edition. The plates, newly engraved, are based on plates in A Volume of Plays [by Sheridan and others] performed at the Theatre, Smoke-Alley, Dublin, 1785 and following. They illustrate Act IV, Scene 1 (the Surface family portraits) and Act IV, Scene 2 (the screen scene). The London cast-list here prints ‘Sir Toby Bumber’ correctly; a variant reads ‘Sir Harry Bumber’.

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