FOULIS PRESS TASSO

Aminta; Favola boscareccia …

In Glasgua, Della Stampa di Roberto ed Andrea Foulis, 1753.

Small 8vo. in fours, pp. [2], 74, with an engraved frontispiece and six other engraved plates by Sebastien le Clerc (some offsetting); a good copy in modern full calf; contemporary marginalia in English and French (vocabulary notes and a few comments).

£125

Approximately:
US $155€147

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Aminta; Favola boscareccia …

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First Foulis Press edition of Tasso’s famous pastoral verse play of 1573, an attractive production with plates from a miniature French edition by the French artist Sebastien le Clerc, acquired by Robert Foulis on his European travels.

Gaskell 266.

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