Les Indiens, ou Tippoo-Saïb, fils d’Hyder-Ally, &c. Avec quelques particularités sur ce prince, sur ses ambassadeurs en France, sur l’audience qui leur a été donnée par sa majesté Louis XVI, à Versailles le 10 Août 1788; précedées du précis d’une partie de l’administration de M. Hastings, &c.; & suivies de quelques détails relatifs aux événemens de la guerre de 1782 dans l’Inde ...

A Londres [i.e. Paris?] et se trouve à Paris, chez Le Jay, 1788.

8vo, pp. viii, 229, [1 errata], 1 folding table at end; woodcut head-piece; very occasional light foxing; very good in contemporary calf, gilt fillet border to covers, spine gilt in compartments with lettering-piece, gilt edges, blue paste paper endpapers; some rubbing to extremities; contemporary marginal annotation to p. 193; a nice copy.

£800

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Les Indiens, ou Tippoo-Saïb, fils d’Hyder-Ally, &c. Avec quelques particularités sur ce prince, sur ses ambassadeurs en France, sur l’audience qui leur a été donnée par sa majesté Louis XVI, à Versailles le 10 Août 1788; précedées du précis d’une partie de l’administration de M. Hastings, &c.; & suivies de quelques détails relatifs aux événemens de la guerre de 1782 dans l’Inde ...

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The apparently unrecorded first issue of this work on Tipu Sultan (1750-1799), ruler of the kingdom of Mysore and implacable enemy of the British East India Company. The only copies recorded institutionally (on ESTC, COPAC, and OCLC) have the title Les indiens, ou Tipou-Sultan, fils D’Ayder-Aly and a ‘note indispensable’ explaining that the Sultan’s true name is ‘Tipou-Sultan’ and not ‘Tippoo-Saïb’ and that of his father ‘Ayder-Aly’ rather than ‘Hyder-Ally’, but that the work was printed before these corrections could be made. The title-page was clearly updated on most copies, except this one.

After an introduction discussing how the English and French came to hold power in India, and the career of Joseph Marquis Dupleix, the main body of the text is devoted to Hyder Ali (c. 1720-1782) and Tipu Sultan and their conflicts with the British East India Company in the Anglo-Mysore Wars, with several references to Warren Hastings. Then follows a description of Tipu and his court, and of his audience with Louis XVI in August 1788. The folding plate at the end details the strength of the French army and navy that set out for India in December 1781.

See ESTC T130612. COPAC and OCLC record only copies with the second issue of the title, 3 in the UK (BL, NLS, Royal Asiatic Society) and 2 in the US (Duke and Minnesota).

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