“Progress and poverty,” a criticism of Mr. Henry George. Being two lectures delivered in St. Andrew’s Hall, Newman Street, London, by the late Arnold Toynbee, M.A., Senior Bursar and Tutor of Balliol College, Oxford.

London, Kegan Paul, Trench & Co., 1883.

8vo, pp. 54; a very good copy, disbound.

£50

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“Progress and poverty,” a criticism of Mr. Henry George. Being two lectures delivered in St. Andrew’s Hall, Newman Street, London, by the late Arnold Toynbee, M.A., Senior Bursar and Tutor of Balliol College, Oxford.

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First edition. The transcript of two lectures delivered in 1883 by the social reformer and political economist Arnold Toynbee (1852-1883) criticising Henry George’s Progress and Poverty (1879). Toynbee was convinced that George’s work was too one-sided and sought to mitigate its influence on the leaders of working-class opinion. The prefatory note explains that Toynbee had intended on expanding the shorthand notes of these speeches into a more developed treatise but was sadly overcome by illness and perished before this could be accomplished.

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