Lectures on Diet and Regimen: being a systematic Inquiry into the most rational Means of preserving Health and prolonging Life: together with physiological and chemical Explanations, calculated chiefly for the Use of Families, in order to banish the prevailing Abuses and Prejudices in medicine. The second Edition, improved and enlarged with considerable Additions …

London: Printed for T. N. Longman and O. Rees … 1799.

8vo., pp. [2], 708, [4, adverts], wanting the half-title; a very good copy in contemporary tree calf, spine ruled gilt, red morocco label; Fasque library bookplate of John Gladstone, father of the Prime Minister.

£375

Approximately:
US $491€427

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Second edition, much revised and expanded, printed in the same year as the first: ‘Many important and useful articles have been added, especially in the fifth Chapter, “Of Food and Drink.”’ Willich’s very popular manual was based on a series of lecture given by the eminent physician at Bath in 1798, and includes material on the state of modern medicine, the air, baths, clothing, exercise, sleep, excretion, sexual intercourse, the mind and the eyes, as well as a long chapter on food and drink (pp. 291-439), with descriptions of the nature and properties of various comestibles. A postscript explains that this work dealing with the preservation of the healthy body is to be followed by one on the treatment of the diseased body, and includes a list of questions to ask a patient to aid in diagnosis.

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