Le miniature Italiane del Kupferstichkabinett di Berlino.

Florence, Edizioni Polistampa, 2019.

Folio (31 x 24 cm), pp. 365, [3]; 40 leaves of colour plates, reproductions in black and white; bound in pictorial card wrappers.

£75

Approximately:
US $91€86

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From the presentation leaf: ‘Bernard Quaritch Ltd is delighted to be a sponsor of this magnificent publication. We feel sure that our German founder, both as publisher of scholarly works and dealer in medieval manuscripts, would have been proud to support Beatrice Alai’s catalogue of the Italian miniatures in one of the great German collections. Quaritch would certainly have known the Kupferstichkabinett’s illustrious director Friedrich Lippmann, for in 1888 he published Lippmann’s The Art of wood-engraving in Italy in the fifteenth century, the same year in which Lippmann acquired from Quaritch the splendid Roman calendar leaf which is described within these pages.’

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