Plan of the action of the 21st of March fought near Alexandria by the French under Gn. Menou and the English under Sir Ralph Abercrombie.  Dated ‘July 1st 1832’.

350 x 250 mm, manuscript ink and wash plan; ‘J. Whatman 1832’ watermark; reinforced with Japanese tissue; old fold and corners repaired.

£650

Approximately:
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Plan of the action of the 21st of March fought near Alexandria by the French under Gn. Menou and the English under Sir Ralph Abercrombie.  Dated ‘July 1st 1832’.

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A detailed plan accurately illustrating the movements of the British and French armies at the battle of Alexandria. In it, Sir Ralph Abercrombie was fatally wounded but the action was considered a British victory as the French were forced out of Egypt soon after. This plan is signed ‘J. W. Hamilton’.


T2914

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