De la monnaie et de la puissance d’achat des métaux précieux dans l’Empire Byzantin . . . Extrait de la Revue “Byzantion”.

Liège, Imprimerie H. Vaillant-Carmanne, 1924.

8vo, pp. 50, [2, blank]; partly unopened in the original printed blue wrappers; spine and edges rubbed and slightly chipped; from the library of Robert Byron, but without his ownership inscription.

£45

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US $60€51

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An offprint, with its own title-page and pagination, of this important study. This is a presentation copy, inscribed in ink ‘To Robert Byron. A. A.’ at the head of the front wrapper. Andreades was the first professor of public finance at the University of Athens and the author of a monumental work on the history of Greek public finance.

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