The Stock Exchange from Within. Illustrated from photographs.

New York, Doubleday, Page & Company, 1913.

8vo, pp. [10], 459, [1]; with 3 half-tone plates; original publisher’s cloth, lettered gilt, worn at head and tail of spine.

£50

Approximately:
US $69€57

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The Stock Exchange from Within. Illustrated from photographs.

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First edition of this historical account of the New York Stock Exchange.

According to Markham’s A Financial history of the U.S. (2002), Vol. 1, p.157, Antwerp, a broker at E.F. Hutton, advised and represented Winston Churchill on the stock market just before a crash.

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