At First, All Went Well… & Other Brief Lives.

London, Bernard Quaritch Ltd, 2019.

8vo, (230 x 145 mm), pp. 382; cloth-bound.

£40

Approximately:
US $50€46

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This book brings together eighty obituaries written by Nicolas Barker. The first were published in 1966 and the last in 2018. Print links them all: they were printers, publishers, librarians, booksellers or book collectors, their lives joined by a common dedication to the printed word and all that goes with it.

At First, All Went Well… opens with C.H. Wilkinson and Sir Sydney Roberts and ends with Barney Rosenthal and Ian Doyle. Such people as Graham Pollard, Don McKenzie, Nicolete Gray, Mary Hyde, Bernard Breslauer, Justin Howes and Joe Tanner are then chronicled along the way.

In 2013 Quaritch published Nicolas Barker at eighty: a list of his publications to mark his 80th birthday. As the book records, Nicolas Barker has written on an extensive range of topics including medieval manuscripts, calligraphy, forgery, the book trade, typography, bibliophily and bookbinding.



ISBN 978-0-9955192-1-3

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