Bibliotheca Lindesiana. The Lives and Collections of Alexander William, 25th Earl of Crawford and 8th Earl of Balcarres, and James Ludovic, 26th Earl of Crawford and 9th Earl of Balcarres.

The Roxburghe Club, 1977.

£50

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Bibliotheca Lindesiana. The Lives and Collections of Alexander William, 25th Earl of Crawford and 8th Earl of Balcarres, and James Ludovic, 26th Earl of Crawford and 9th Earl of Balcarres.

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The Bibliotheca Lindesiana was perhaps the finest private library assembled in the nineteenth century. Nicolas Barker considers the library’s purpose and traces the circumstances of its formation in detail, in the process adding considerably to the biographies of the 25th and 26th Earls of Crawford, two highly significant figures in the history of collecting.

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