Del Commercio dissertazione.

Rome, Niccolo and Marco Pagliarini, 1757.

8vo, pp. xx, 154, [1] colophon, [1] blank; a clean, crisp copy, uncut in contemporary marbled boards.

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Second edition to be authorized by Belloni, (first, 1750) – the first edition to include the author’s considerations on ‘imaginary money’ (pp. 135-154) – of a work notable for its argument in favour of restrictions on the export of money by the Vatican banker Girolamo Belloni (1688–1760). The work enjoyed great success: it received seventeen editions between 1750 and 1788, was translated into several languages (an English edition appeared in 1752) and led to the ennoblement of Belloni by Benedict XIV.

See, for the first edition, Carpenter XIV (1); Einaudi 395; Goldsmiths’ 8506; Kress Italian 266.

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