REVISED BY THE EDITOR OF THE BLACK DWARF

Plan of Parliamentary Reform, in the Form of a Catechism, with Reasons for each Article. With an Introduction, shewing the Necessity of radical, and the Inadequacy of moderate, Reform …

London: Printed in the Year 1817. Re-printed and Re-published, with Notes and Alterations, by Permission of the Author, by T. J. Wooler … 1818.

8vo., pp. [4], 256; a good copy in quarter cloth and drab boards, somewhat soiled, with the original printed spine label and a later handwritten label, traces of large paper label removed from front cover.

£225

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Plan of Parliamentary Reform, in the Form of a Catechism, with Reasons for each Article. With an Introduction, shewing the Necessity of radical, and the Inadequacy of moderate, Reform …

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First edition thus of an inexpensive reprint of Bentham’s Plan of Parliamentary Reform (1817), the style adapted by Thomas Wooler, with Bentham’s permission, to ‘render it more easy of comprehension to the popular reader’. In this form it first appeared in instalments in Wooler’s radical journal The Black Dwarf.


Einaudi 414; Goldsmiths’ 22261; not in Kress.

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