Histoire de l’économie politique en Europe, depuis les anciens jusqu’à nos jours, suivie d’une bibliographie raisonnée des principaux ouvrages d’économie politique …

Paris, Guillaumin, 1837.

Two vols, 8vo, pp. xxviii, 432; 480; a very good copy in contemporary quarter calf, spines gilt, one corner and spine of vol. I a little gnawed.

£300

Approximately:
US $406€358

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First edition of ‘the first major history of political economy’ (The New Palgrave). Blanqui (1798–1854) taught at the Institution Massin, where he came into contact with J. B. Say, who was greatly impressed by him. In 1833, he succeeded Say as holder of the chair of political and industrial economy at the Conservatoire des Arts et des Métiers. The Histoire, in addition to the history of economic ideas, covers economic history from the ancient world to the early 1840s, and according to Schumpeter ‘enjoyed international success because of its indubitable usefulness’ (p. 498). The ‘Bibliographie raisonnée’ covers some 84 pages, listing works in English, French, German, Italian and Spanish.

Goldsmiths’ 29765; Kress C.4312; Mattioli 343; this edition not in Einaudi.

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