Autograph letter, signed, to the novelist and socialite Lady Morgan, explaining why he cannot join her party.

‘Wednesday Morning’, no date, but late 1840.

1 page, 8vo., signed at the foot; in very good condition.

£175

Approximately:
US $240€205

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Autograph letter, signed, to the novelist and socialite Lady Morgan, explaining why he cannot join her party.

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‘I have been dying also several times during the last six months – I hope however to survive a few weeks when I shall be nearer to you when, in my new house in Victoria Square, I shall hope to see you frequently.’ Campbell suffered increasing ill health towards the end of his life, but continued to publish. In the winter of 1840 he moved to Victoria Square: ‘At present I am getting slowly through the press – with my Life of Petrarch – which will be out next month.’

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