FROM THE LIBRARY OF ROBERT BYRON

Monuments d’architecture byzantine.

Paris, Les Editions d’Art et d’Histoire, 1934.

Small folio, pp. vi, 216, [2], with 48 plates; numerous plans in the text; occasional very light spotting, but a good copy in the original purple printed wrappers; small white mark on upper cover, spine faded; from the library of the travel writer Robert Byron (1905–1941), with his ownership inscription in pencil on half-title.

£250

Approximately:
US $343€292

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First edition of this classic account of Byzantine architecture, published posthumously in the series Histoire de l’art byzantin under the direction of Charles Diehl.

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