Sir Thomas Smith’s Misgovernment of the Virginia Company by Nicholas Ferrar. A manuscript from the Devonshire papers at Chatsworth House. Edited with an introduction by D. R. Ransome.

The Roxburghe Club, 1990.

£125

Approximately:
US $160€142

Add to basket Make an enquiry

Added to your basket:
Sir Thomas Smith’s Misgovernment of the Virginia Company by Nicholas Ferrar. A manuscript from the Devonshire papers at Chatsworth House. Edited with an introduction by D. R. Ransome.

Checkout now

Ferrar’s text is a crucial document in the history of the Virginia Company and its colony. It reveals the intense animosity which destroyed the Company and is a vivid, powerful and one-sided denunciation of the maladministration that had brought the Company down. It is also something more – a vital document of the first English colony to be permanently established in the New World. The document is printed here in full facsimile, together with a diplomatic transcription and introduction by David Ransome, a distinguished historian of early America.

You may also be interested in...

HOOPER, Luther.

Hand-loom weaving plain & ornamental ... with line drawings by the author & Noel Rooke: also collotype illustrations from ancient and modern textiles.

First edition, the copy owned and used by Ethel (later Mary) Gill (1878-1961), wife of Eric Gill (1882-1940), and later by their second daughter Petra (1906-1999). Petra was born the year before the Gills moved to Ditchling in Sussex, where they established a remarkable, largely Catholic, community of artists and craftsmen. Petra – her father’s muse as an adolescent – learnt to weave at Ditchling in Ethel Mairet’s workshop and later taught spinning and weaving herself at the short-lived boarding school established by Gill at Capel-y-Ffin in the early 1930s. Having broken off her engagement with the painter and poet David Jones, Petra married the letterer, engraver and cartoonist Denis Tegetmeier in 1930, weaving her own wedding dress.

Read more

DEVOTIONAL EMBLEM BOOK WITH RUBENS TITLE-PAGE HAEFTEN, Benedictus van.

Regia via crucis.

First edition of an important counter-reformation devotional emblem book, with a title-page designed by Peter Paul Rubens. Haeften (1588-1648) was provost of the Benedictine abbey of Affligem, Belgium, and played an important role in the reform of the Benedictine order. The Regia via crucis was his most important work, running to over 40 editions, including translations into Dutch, French, Spanish and other languages. The work was intended ‘to provide the (Catholic) reader with a good understanding of the significance of the Stations of the Cross, to inspire imitation of Christ’s example, and thereby to become acquainted with the way to the Kingdom of God. The rather abstract spiritual journey that the human soul had to make towards this goal is made more concrete by the ... selection of such principal figures as the Virgins Anima – the personification of the human soul – and Staurophila – a Greek name that literally means the one who adores the cross. Their experiences in the imitation of Christ and the resulting lessons of life were nothing else but allegorical examples that were to lead every reader to the just and good. The engraved illustrations are very important in this regard as they support the meaning of the text in a simple and clear emblematic manner.’ (The illustration of books published by the Moretuses p. 118-9).

Read more