Odalisques & Arabesques: Orientalist Photography 1839–1925.

[London], Quaritch, 2007.

4to (285 x 250 mm), pp. 308, with over 500 illustrations, including 85 full-page tritones; dark brown cloth, pictorial dust-jacket.

£60

Approximately:
US $76€68

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Profusely illustrated, this is the most comprehensive survey to date of nineteenth- and early twentieth-century photography of the Middle East and North Africa. Using Orientalist painting as a counterpoint, it primarily relates the extraordinarily rich visual documentation of the peoples and cultures of the ‘Orient’. Many of the photographs reproduced here have never been published before. Biographies of more than 90 photographers are given, with details of their various identifying marks, allowing now the correct attribution of works that have hitherto been anonymous or misattributed.

ISBN: 978-0-9550852-5-3

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