Analysis syllogistica seu theses scoto-logicae de syllogismo in communi, ac resolutione eiusdem in ea, ex quibus constat. Quas ex praelectionibus P.F. Epiphanii Krump ... publicae disputationi proposuerunt F. Fr. Massaeus Kresslinger, Onuphrius Hueter, Robertus Rieder.

Ingolstadt, Thomas Grass, 1695.

8vo, pp. [viii], 144; woodcut head- and tailpieces; aside from some occasional marking, clean and fresh throughout; in contemporary patterned wrappers; somewhat sunned and faded, head and foot of spine chipped, and some wear, but still a good copy.

£195

Approximately:
US $267€228

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Analysis syllogistica seu theses scoto-logicae de syllogismo in communi, ac resolutione eiusdem in ea, ex quibus constat. Quas ex praelectionibus P.F. Epiphanii Krump ... publicae disputationi proposuerunt F. Fr. Massaeus Kresslinger, Onuphrius Hueter, Robertus Rieder.

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Very rare thesis on the syllogism, by the Scotist Franciscan philosopher and theologian Epiphanius Krump, with students including Massaeus Kresslinger (1672-1742), who went on to publish a number of works on canon law and moral theology. Here, Krump discusses predicates, the basic rules of syllogisms, the structure of argument, and different types of fallacy.

OCLC: 633463927, with no locations cited.

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